Tristan Goligher's Film Blog

A scrapbook of information, articles and inspiration for filmmakers and screenwriters.

— @Tristangoligher on Twitter.

Tagged writing:

Grasp this and you’ll have done film school in 3 and a half minutes.

Wilder on Lubitsch. 

Jan 11

Fantastically useful series of interviews, and videos of top screen writers discussing their craft.

Huge  credit to Austin Film Festival for making this happen. Do not miss.

Watch here.

May 17

A writing tip from TSL.

It might be obvious but it’s also true. Make your characters life difficult.

As always with things I blog form The Script Lab this comes with a caveat. Don’t use this advice to start writing. It’s justanother question you can ask of your work, once you’ve got it down.

Here’s the TSL piece in full.

Mar 27

Tristan Goligher's Film Blog

Posted on Wednesday February 15th 2012 at 09:33pm. Its tags are listed below.

Was it better to have a group composed of close friends who had worked together before? Or did strangers make better theatre?
The New Yorker

Grasp this and you’ll have done film school in 3 and a half minutes.

Wilder on Lubitsch. 

Tristan Goligher's Film Blog

Posted on Monday September 12th 2011 at 10:49am. Its tags are listed below.

The things we admire in men, kindness and generosity, openness, honesty, understanding and feeling are the concomitants of failure in our system. And those traits we detest, sharpness, greed, acquisitiveness, meanness, egotism and self interest are the traits of success. And while men admire the quality of the first they love the produce of the second.
John Steinbeck, Cannery Row

Tristan Goligher's Film Blog

Posted on Monday September 5th 2011 at 11:19pm. Its tags are listed below.

Elizabeth Gilbert on nurturing creativity

Humility, inspiration and the creativity.

I know a few people who could do with watching this…

Click title for video.

Tristan Goligher's Film Blog

Posted on Wednesday August 31st 2011 at 03:54pm. Its tags are listed below.

I start a book and I want to make it perfect, want it to turn every color, want it to be the world. Ten pages in, I’ve already blown it, limited it, made it less, marred it. That’s very discouraging. I hate the book at that point. After a while I arrive at an accommodation: Well, it’s not the ideal, it’s not the perfect object I wanted to make, but maybe—if I go ahead and finish it anyway—I can get it right next time. Maybe I can have another chance.

Tristan Goligher's Film Blog

Posted on Tuesday August 23rd 2011 at 08:46pm. Its tags are listed below.

Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 71, Joan Didion

Wonderful interview with Joan Didion, on her work and the mystery of writing.

From Paris Review

Click title for full article.

On Story - An incredible resource for writers

Fantastically useful series of interviews, and videos of top screen writers discussing their craft.

Huge  credit to Austin Film Festival for making this happen. Do not miss.

Watch here.

Tristan Goligher's Film Blog

Posted on Monday April 18th 2011 at 01:05pm. Its tags are listed below.

When creating an interesting protagonist, it’s essential that your audience cares about the character, hoping the character will do the right thing, but constantly fearing that the character will make another bad decision. It’s this yin and yang of hope and fear that connects the audience, hooking them deeper, making them want to watch.

From The Script Lab

This is pretty schematic as usual from The Script Lab. None the less it’s a useful bit of advice. Read the full article here.

On writing: authors reveal the secrets of their craft

A wonderful collection of interviews with writers recorded for the British Library.

This is a mine of ideas, and inspiration.

There’s a CD available, but click the title for an article with audio clips.

Obstacles - The hard part of your story

A writing tip from TSL.

It might be obvious but it’s also true. Make your characters life difficult.

As always with things I blog form The Script Lab this comes with a caveat. Don’t use this advice to start writing. It’s justanother question you can ask of your work, once you’ve got it down.

Here’s the TSL piece in full.